Eddie Murray Los Angeles Dodgers

Age: 64 (February 24, 1956) | aka Steady Eddie | 6' 2" | 200lbs. | Bats: Both
Tm Lg YEAR G AB R H BB SO 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BA OBP SLG BB% SO% BABIP G/L/F % $4x4 $5x5
BAL AL 1977 160 611 81 173 48 104 29 2 27 88 0 1 .283 .333 .470 7 16 .300 n/a
BAL AL 1978 161 610 85 174 70 97 32 3 27 95 6 5 .285 .356 .480 10 14 .298 n/a
BAL AL 1979 159 606 90 179 72 78 30 2 25 99 10 2 .295 .369 .475 10 11 .303 n/a
BAL AL 1980 158 621 100 186 54 71 36 2 32 116 7 2 .300 .354 .519 8 10 .294 n/a
BAL AL 1981 99 378 57 111 40 43 21 2 22 78 2 3 .294 .360 .534 9 10 .282 n/a
BAL AL 1982 151 550 87 174 70 82 30 1 32 110 7 2 .316 .391 .549 11 13 .321 n/a
BAL AL 1983 156 582 115 178 86 90 30 3 33 111 5 1 .306 .393 .538 13 13 .310 n/a
BAL AL 1984 162 588 97 180 107 87 26 3 29 110 10 2 .306 .410 .509 15 12 .315 n/a
BAL AL 1985 156 583 111 173 84 68 37 1 31 124 5 2 .297 .383 .523 12 10 .289 n/a
BAL AL 1986 137 495 61 151 78 49 25 1 17 84 3 0 .305 .396 .463 13 8 .309 n/a
BAL AL 1987 160 618 89 171 73 80 28 3 30 91 1 2 .277 .352 .477 11 12 .276 n/a
BAL AL 1988 161 603 75 171 75 78 27 2 28 84 5 2 .284 .361 .474 11 11 .286 n/a
LAN NL 1989 160 594 66 147 87 85 29 1 20 88 7 2 .247 .342 .401 13 12 .256 n/a
LAN NL 1990 155 558 96 184 82 64 22 3 26 95 8 5 .330 .414 .520 13 10 .335 n/a
LAN NL 1991 153 576 69 150 55 74 23 1 19 96 10 3 .260 .321 .403 9 12 .267 n/a
NYN NL 1992 156 551 64 144 66 74 37 2 16 93 4 2 .261 .336 .423 11 12 .273 n/a
NYN NL 1993 154 610 77 174 40 61 28 1 27 100 2 2 .285 .325 .467 6 9 .277 n/a
CLE AL 1994 108 433 57 110 31 53 21 1 17 76 8 4 .254 .302 .425 7 11 .254 n/a
CLE AL 1995 113 436 68 141 39 65 21 0 21 82 5 1 .323 .375 .516 8 14 .338 n/a
CLE AL 1996 88 336 33 88 34 45 9 1 12 45 3 0 .262 .326 .402 9 12 .269 n/a
BAL AL 1996 64 230 36 59 27 42 12 0 10 34 1 0 .257 .327 .439 10 16 .266 n/a
ANA AL 1997 46 160 13 35 13 24 7 0 3 15 1 0 .219 .273 .319 7 14 .235 n/a
LAN NL 1997 9 7 0 2 2 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 .286 .444 .286 22 22 .400 n/a
Career 21yrs 3026 11336 1627 3255 1333 1516 560 35 504 1917 110 43 .287 .359 .476 10 12 .291 n/a
Welcome! You are invited to wander around and read all of the comments that have been posted here at Patton & Co., but as soon as you register you can see the bid limits that Alex, Peter and Mike propose for each player, and you can post your own comments. Registering is free, so please join us!

Vic Power was smooth at first in Cleveland, and all the Indians had to do to get him was to trade Roger Maris to Kansas City. 

David Molyneaux NeauxBrainers ()

Your point about dWAR is more than supported by Vic Power. In his Gold Glove years (eight of them, all in a row), his dWARs ranged from 0.9 to -0.8. His career dWAR is -0.8. His career OPS+ is 97, so obviously somebody beside the sportswriters thought he was pretty good with the glove.

In countless games against the Yankees, I got to watch him and he was way better than that.

Alex Patton Alex

WAR for 1B defensively is basically always negative due to the positional adjustment.  Keith Hernandez's career dWAR is 1.3.  His career best is 0.9 and he had  a lot of negative seasons mixed in.

FWIW, he's first in assists all-time at 1B.  That goes along with 1st in games at the position, but it's not like he's down in the pack.  I'm not sure how putouts or range factor matter much for a 1B.  And, errors, we all know how useless they are.

Total zone runs has him 10th.  That's a counting stat, not a rate stat, so the fact that he played a lot of games helps him.  The guys ahead of him are generally considered the greatest fielders at the position ever.  Keith Hernandez, Todd Helton, Adrian Gonzalez, John Olerud lead the pack.  Pujols, George Scott, Mark Grace, Pete O'Brien, and Vic Power (who I don't know).

Eugene Freedman EugeneFreed

And he never once got his uniform dirty diving for a ground ball. I used to get so aggravated watching him waive at ground balls go by. But, yeah, he was a great & consistent hitter.

Mike Davis BeanCounter

Viewed through the prism of today's metrics, he gains in stature. Except in the vexing matter of defense. In his three Gold Glove years, his dWARs...

1982: -0.5

1983: 0.1

1984: 0.2

Careere dWAR: -11.6

Alex Patton Alex

I was lucky enough to watch Murray near the end, when he arrived in Cleveland to pass on the smarts of his years, as young guys such as Manny, Thome, Belle, and Lofton soaked it up on the way to a World Series. 

David Molyneaux NeauxBrainers ()

I couldn't agree more Eugene. He was a steady and dangerous hitter to the end.

GEOFF CRESAP SydThrift

Joe Poz didn't include Steady Eddie in his top 100.  I know that seems like blasphemy to everyone.  If not, it should.  Eddie had 500 HR and 3000 hits, mostly in the down hitting period of the 70s and 80s.

Some call him an accumulator, but you know what, it was that his peak lasted 20 years and he never had a career year.  Every year was the same.  Steady Eddie.  300/30/100 when those numbers meant something.  But, even in advanced statistics, maybe even more impressive, he had an OPS+ of 156 for 3 straight years, then knocked it up a notch to lead the league with 157 in 1984.  Steady Eddie.

Today, Joe Poz fixed his error by including Eddie as one of his favorite players. 

Eugene Freedman EugeneFreed