Tim Raines Montreal Expos

Age: 61 (September 16, 1959) | aka Rock | 5' 9" | 202lbs. | Bats: Both
Tm Lg YEAR G AB R H BB SO 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BA OBP SLG BB% SO% BABIP G/L/F % $4x4 $5x5
MON NL 1979 6 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0.00 0.00 0.00 0 0 0.00 n/a
MON NL 1980 15 20 5 1 6 3 0 0 0 0 5 0 .050 .269 .050 22 12 .059 n/a
MON NL 1981 88 313 61 95 45 31 13 7 5 37 71 11 .304 .391 .438 12 9 .321 n/a
MON NL 1982 156 647 90 179 75 83 32 8 4 43 78 16 .277 .353 .369 10 12 .312 n/a
MON NL 1983 156 615 133 183 97 70 32 8 11 71 90 14 .298 .393 .429 13 10 .320 n/a
MON NL 1984 160 622 106 192 87 69 38 9 8 60 75 10 .309 .393 .437 12 10 .335 n/a
MON NL 1985 150 575 115 184 81 60 30 13 11 41 70 9 .320 .405 .475 12 9 .341 n/a
MON NL 1986 151 580 91 194 78 60 35 10 9 62 70 9 .334 .413 .476 12 9 .360 n/a
MON NL 1987 139 530 123 175 90 52 34 8 18 68 50 5 .330 .429 .526 14 8 .339 n/a
MON NL 1988 109 429 66 116 53 44 19 7 12 48 33 7 .270 .350 .431 11 9 .276 n/a
MON NL 1989 145 517 76 148 93 48 29 6 9 60 41 9 .286 .395 .418 15 8 .299 n/a
MON NL 1990 130 457 65 131 70 43 11 5 9 62 49 16 .287 .379 .392 13 8 .295 n/a
CHA AL 1991 155 609 102 163 83 68 20 6 5 50 51 15 .268 .359 .345 12 10 .293 n/a
CHA AL 1992 144 551 102 162 81 48 22 9 7 54 45 6 .294 .380 .405 13 8 .308 n/a
CHA AL 1993 115 415 75 127 64 35 16 4 16 54 21 7 .306 .401 .480 13 7 .303 n/a
CHA AL 1994 101 384 80 102 61 43 15 5 10 52 13 0 .266 .365 .409 13 10 .275 n/a
CHA AL 1995 133 502 81 143 70 52 25 4 12 67 13 2 .285 .374 .422 12 9 .297 n/a
NYA AL 1996 59 201 45 57 34 29 10 0 9 33 10 1 .284 .383 .468 14 12 .287 n/a
NYA AL 1997 74 271 56 87 41 34 20 2 4 38 8 5 .321 .403 .454 13 11 .347 n/a
NYA AL 1998 109 321 53 93 55 49 13 1 5 47 8 3 .290 .395 .383 14 13 .326 n/a
OAK AL 1999 58 135 20 29 26 17 5 0 4 17 4 1 .215 .337 .341 16 10 .216 n/a
MON NL 2001 47 78 13 24 18 6 8 1 0 4 1 0 .308 .433 .436 19 6 .329 n/a
BAL AL 2001 4 11 1 3 0 3 0 0 1 5 0 0 .273 .250 .545 0 25 .250 n/a
FLA NL 2002 98 89 9 17 22 19 3 0 1 7 0 0 .191 .351 .258 19 17 .225 n/a -1
Career 23yrs 2502 8872 1571 2605 1330 966 430 113 170 980 808 146 .294 .385 .425 13 9 .312 n/a
Welcome! You are invited to wander around and read all of the comments that have been posted here at Patton & Co., but as soon as you register you can see the bid limits that Alex, Peter and Mike propose for each player, and you can post your own comments. Registering is free, so please join us!

I agree, Slyke. I tried changing his team affiliation to the Expos, Alex, but it doesn't seem to want to accept the change. As an old 'Spos fan, it just doesn't seem right to have him listed as a Marlin.

Tim McLeod tlmcleod
Jul 31 '17

Just for fun...Rickey, Raines, Boggs, and Brock per 162 games(available for all players on bref)

Times on base. Rickey 281 Raines 258 Boggs 296 Brock 237

Runs scored via HR. Rickey 16 Raines 11 Boggs 8 Brock 9

Times reaching scoring position on their own(non HR):

Rickey 87 Raines 83 Boggs 44 Brock 92

Outs made Rickey 446 Raines 428 Boggs 433 Brock 482

PA Rickey 702 Raines 671 Boggs 713 Brock 696


van wilhoite LVW
Jul 30 '17

Looking forward to watching the HOF induction speeches today.

Just happy Raines finally got the call.

The second best lead-off hitter of all-time in my humble opinion.

Keith Cromer Slyke
Jul 30 '17

Boggs % of career starts by batting order breakdown:

Leadoff 39.8%

2nd 27.5%

3rd 22.4%

4th-9th 10.2%

Boggs actually hit better from the 2 and 3 spot than he did from the leadoff spot

van wilhoite LVW
Jan 24 '17

The interesting thing about the whole Raines is the 2nd best leadoff hitter argument is - while he had a majority of his games as leadoff hitter, only 63% of his plate appearances were from leadoff.  He batted 3rd a lot in his prime for the Expos.  And, rightfully so.  He was their best hitter.  Compare that to Rickey (98.3) or Lofton (85.9%) and you see that they were more purely leadoff hitters.

Eugene Freedman EugeneFreed
Jan 24 '17

Boggs's most common slot, by far, was the leadoff spot. I don't know what else you can call him. 

scott pianowski ballfour
Jan 24 '17

I don't know if we can qualify Boggs as a leadoff hitter. He only started 927 games batting leadoff out of 2439 career games. He was more like a hybrid 1-2-3 hitter similar to Pete Rose being a hybrid position player.

van wilhoite LVW
Jan 23 '17

I'm all for Raines and glad he finally got his due, but are we sure he's the second-best leadoff man of all time? Wade Boggs has a pretty good case, too. Yeah, he didn't run at all, but we know what we primarily want from the No. 1 slot - and Boggs excelled at that. 

Russo and Kornheiser did a fine job of embarrassing themselves over the last week. On one hand, I think it's a mistake to immediate gang tackle someone who prefers a small HOF; that's just a personal preference, and there will never be one set standard. In a sense I feel like some of the younger writers are protecting their childhood as much as anything else. But Russo was like Ben Gazzara driving in Road House, all over the place. Have a cohesive point, man. 

scott pianowski ballfour
Jan 23 '17

Definitely an OPS+ difference we're looking at. But defense?

How much worse is a dWAR of -17.1, spread out over 19 seasons, than a dWAR of -9.5, spread out over 23 seasons?

Raines comes out on the positive side of dWAR three times, Brock twice.

Safe to say neither got into the Hall for his efforts in the field.

That's by both eyewitness accounts during their careers and the hindsight of dWAR.

Alex Patton Alex
Jan 23 '17

There's a difference between a 109 OPS+ and a 123 OPS+.

I saw some arguments this winter that Brock's defense is underrated and that the metrics cheated him. Maybe so.

But looking just at Raines and Brock's offensive numbers, it isn't particularly close. Take out Raines and Brock's negative offensive production at the beginning/end of their careers (this exercise helps Brock more than it helps Raines), and Raines has a 68.5 oWAR. Brock has a 49.6.

WAR has its flaws, but that's a significant enough difference not to be an anomaly.

Mike Gianella MikeG
Jan 23 '17