Tim Raines Montreal Expos

Age: 61 (September 16, 1959) | aka Rock | 5' 9" | 202lbs. | Bats: Both
Tm Lg YEAR G AB R H BB SO 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BA OBP SLG BB% SO% BABIP G/L/F % $4x4 $5x5
MON NL 1979 6 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0.00 0.00 0.00 0 0 0.00 n/a
MON NL 1980 15 20 5 1 6 3 0 0 0 0 5 0 .050 .269 .050 22 12 .059 n/a
MON NL 1981 88 313 61 95 45 31 13 7 5 37 71 11 .304 .391 .438 12 9 .321 n/a
MON NL 1982 156 647 90 179 75 83 32 8 4 43 78 16 .277 .353 .369 10 12 .312 n/a
MON NL 1983 156 615 133 183 97 70 32 8 11 71 90 14 .298 .393 .429 13 10 .320 n/a
MON NL 1984 160 622 106 192 87 69 38 9 8 60 75 10 .309 .393 .437 12 10 .335 n/a
MON NL 1985 150 575 115 184 81 60 30 13 11 41 70 9 .320 .405 .475 12 9 .341 n/a
MON NL 1986 151 580 91 194 78 60 35 10 9 62 70 9 .334 .413 .476 12 9 .360 n/a
MON NL 1987 139 530 123 175 90 52 34 8 18 68 50 5 .330 .429 .526 14 8 .339 n/a
MON NL 1988 109 429 66 116 53 44 19 7 12 48 33 7 .270 .350 .431 11 9 .276 n/a
MON NL 1989 145 517 76 148 93 48 29 6 9 60 41 9 .286 .395 .418 15 8 .299 n/a
MON NL 1990 130 457 65 131 70 43 11 5 9 62 49 16 .287 .379 .392 13 8 .295 n/a
CHA AL 1991 155 609 102 163 83 68 20 6 5 50 51 15 .268 .359 .345 12 10 .293 n/a
CHA AL 1992 144 551 102 162 81 48 22 9 7 54 45 6 .294 .380 .405 13 8 .308 n/a
CHA AL 1993 115 415 75 127 64 35 16 4 16 54 21 7 .306 .401 .480 13 7 .303 n/a
CHA AL 1994 101 384 80 102 61 43 15 5 10 52 13 0 .266 .365 .409 13 10 .275 n/a
CHA AL 1995 133 502 81 143 70 52 25 4 12 67 13 2 .285 .374 .422 12 9 .297 n/a
NYA AL 1996 59 201 45 57 34 29 10 0 9 33 10 1 .284 .383 .468 14 12 .287 n/a
NYA AL 1997 74 271 56 87 41 34 20 2 4 38 8 5 .321 .403 .454 13 11 .347 n/a
NYA AL 1998 109 321 53 93 55 49 13 1 5 47 8 3 .290 .395 .383 14 13 .326 n/a
OAK AL 1999 58 135 20 29 26 17 5 0 4 17 4 1 .215 .337 .341 16 10 .216 n/a
MON NL 2001 47 78 13 24 18 6 8 1 0 4 1 0 .308 .433 .436 19 6 .329 n/a
BAL AL 2001 4 11 1 3 0 3 0 0 1 5 0 0 .273 .250 .545 0 25 .250 n/a
FLA NL 2002 98 89 9 17 22 19 3 0 1 7 0 0 .191 .351 .258 19 17 .225 n/a -1
Career 23yrs 2502 8872 1571 2605 1330 966 430 113 170 980 808 146 .294 .385 .425 13 9 .312 n/a
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Thanks, Eugene.  

I seem to remember Keith Olbermann writing that his test was the player's dominance within his own era.  Raines, seems to me, certainly did that.

Mike Landau ML-
Jan 11 '16

Besides the drugs another factor that works against Raines and the Hall of Fame is that he is seen primarily as an Expo.  If a Yankee had the same stats he would probably be in.  It seems there is a franchise factor involved in some of the selections.  I have no data just a feeling.

Tom Barnes Turtles
Jan 9 '16

"... had a much better SB% (than Brock)."

It's even better than that. His career SB% (84.9%)  is higher than Brock's best seasonal SB% (83.9%). Raines's career OBP is about the same as Brock's best seasonal OBP (.385).

Raines vs Brock:

BA: Rock

OBP: Rock

SLG: Rock

OPS: Rock

TOB: Rock

HR: Rock

SB%: Rock

OPS+: Rock

wOBA: Rock

wRC+: Rock

WAR: Rock

HOF: Brock

(https://twitter.com/theaceofspaeder/status/677581716794572803)

All these are borrowed from https://twitter.com/theaceofspaeder.

T.J. Rohr TJRohr
Jan 8 '16

The most comprehensive Tim Raines site is:  Raines30.  I contributed a simplistic statistical comparison including all HOF outfielders at the time.  I coined a new stat that didn't go anywhere.  The Rock Pile. 

Eugene Freedman EugeneFreed
Jan 8 '16

Comparing him to another leadoff hitter, Raines reached base more than Hall of Famer Lou Brock in 900 fewer PA, made almost 1000 fewer outs than Brock and had a much better SB%.

van wilhoite LVW
Jan 8 '16

I sent myself down the B-R Play Index Rabbithole.  From 1980-92, my years growing up, the top WAR players were- Rickey, Cal, Boggs, Ozzie, Trammell, Yount, Sandberg, Whitaker, Raines, Schmidt, Dawson, Murray, Brett, Molitor, Bonds, Gwynn, Dale Murphy, Gary Carter, Willie Randolph, and Dwight Evans.  Many of them are considered the worst omissions from the HOF (Trammell now off the ballot, Whitaker one and done, Randolph -2B is very underrepresented- and Dw Evans who was a favorite of many until the huge backlog knocked him down the list - two and done for Dewey).

What's most interesting for me, or maybe not so interesting given my ages of 6-18 in this period, is that many of my favorite players of all-time are in this group.  Boggs, Murray, Schmidt, Raines, Trammell, and Whitaker occupy six of my top 10 favorite position players of all-time.  Carlos Baerga, Albert Belle, Manny Machado, and Jose Altuve round out my current top-10.  

Eugene Freedman EugeneFreed
Jan 8 '16

The four knocks on Raines are: 1) his peak was short; 2) even at his peak he was never truly elite; 3) he stuck around to accumulate stats; 4) he used cocaine and kept vials in his back pocket while playing.

The answers to those knocks are obvious.  His peak was 13 years, from 1981-1993, which isn't short at all.  He was elite.  He was the best player in the NL from 1983-1988 (82-87, he's behind Schmidt; 83-89 he's behind Ozzie Smith).  He lost more time to labor disputes than anyone else.  Not only did he lose the strikes that occurred regularly during his peak and just after, but he also lost the first month of his best season due to collusion, when he was the best player in the NL and should have won the MVP.  He might have set the single season SB record his rookie year, but for the strike.  Had he retired after his peak the same writers would have argued that his career was too short, so sticking around to accumulate stats is a bad argument.  Moreover, he was good as a oft-injured or role player all of those years.  His OBP was still stellar most of those platoon years and he was still an incredibly efficient base stealer.  Paul Molitor went into the HOF and cocaine use hardly effected his vote.  

If his career happened now, he would be thought of totally differently because of the way we view the game.  Between his OBP, his K/BB ratio, and his stolen base rate (both that he was prolific and the success rate), he'd be viewed as Ichiro+ instead of similar to Vince Coleman.  

Eugene Freedman EugeneFreed
Jan 8 '16

Sadly, I fixed his birthday.

Peter Kreutzer Rotoman
Jan 7 '16

Yesterday morning on his NPR Morning Edition weekly gig, Frank Deford discussed HOF voting ... and while he didn't mention Raines, he talked about Rose and Clemens and Bonds and the history of the HOF including the idea that the name and idea for Baseball's HOF came from the "Hall of Fame of Great Americans" built on the campus of Bronx University in 1901 ... and the idea that "Fame" at that time was more closely linked with the word "renown" rather than simply "achievement" or "celebrity" ... and there are probably still some old school guys who resent a baseball player running around the field with cocaine in his back pocket.

Fortunately ... there are less and less of those guys voting, and more and more guys who view that as less of an issue (especially compared to PED abuse) ... and the buzz seems to be that Raines makes it next year.

BTW - I'm impressed by that Benjamin Buttonesque birthdate ... ;-)

Phil Ponebshek Texpope
Jan 7 '16

How?  How is he not in?  I say this to myself every year.  What's the argument against Raines?  Too many teams?

Mike Landau ML-
Jan 7 '16