Albert Pujols Los Angeles Dodgers

Age: 41 (January 16, 1980) | aka Prince Albert,Phat Albert, The Machine, El Hombre | 6' 3" | 240lbs. | Bats: Right 1B-26 DH-12
Tm Lg YEAR G AB R H BB SO 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BA OBP SLG BB% SO% BABIP G/L/F % $4x4 $5x5
STL NL 2002 157 590 118 185 72 69 40 2 34 127 2 4 .314 .394 .561 11 10 .308 n/a 36
STL NL 2003 157 591 137 212 79 65 51 1 43 124 5 1 .359 .439 .667 12 9 .346 n/a 48
STL NL 2004 154 592 133 196 84 52 51 2 46 123 5 5 .331 .415 .657 12 8 .298 n/a 42
STL NL 2005 161 591 129 195 97 65 38 2 41 117 16 2 .330 .430 .609 14 9 .316 n/a 47
STL NL 2006 143 535 119 177 92 50 33 1 49 137 7 2 .331 .431 .671 15 8 .292 n/a 44
STL NL 2007 158 565 99 185 99 58 38 1 32 103 2 6 .327 .429 .568 15 9 .317 n/a 33 30
STL NL 2008 148 524 100 187 104 54 44 0 37 116 7 3 .357 .462 .653 16 8 .340 n/a 44 39
STL NL 2009 160 568 124 186 115 64 45 1 47 135 16 4 .327 .443 .658 16 9 .299 n/a 52 45
STL NL 2010 159 587 115 183 103 76 39 1 42 118 14 4 .312 .414 .596 15 11 .297 n/a 46 40
STL NL 2011 147 579 105 173 61 58 29 0 37 99 9 1 .299 .366 .541 9 9 .277 45/17/38 38 34
LAA AL 2012 154 607 85 173 52 76 50 0 30 105 8 1 .285 .343 .516 8 11 .282 41/19/40 30 26
LAA AL 2013 99 391 49 101 40 55 19 0 17 64 1 1 .258 .330 .437 9 12 .258 38/20/42 14 12
LAA AL 2014 159 633 89 172 48 71 37 1 28 105 5 1 .272 .324 .466 7 10 .265 46/19/35 30 28
LAA AL 2015 157 602 85 147 50 72 22 0 40 95 5 3 .244 .307 .480 8 11 .217 42/16/42 25 24
LAA AL 2016 152 593 71 159 49 75 19 0 31 119 4 0 .268 .323 .457 8 12 .260 44/17/40 27 24
LAA AL 2017 149 593 53 143 37 93 17 0 23 101 3 0 .241 .286 .386 6 15 .249 43/18/38 16 14
LAA AL 2018 117 465 50 114 28 65 20 0 19 64 1 0 .245 .289 .411 6 13 .247 40/22/37 13 12
LAA AL 2019 131 491 55 120 43 68 22 0 23 93 3 0 .244 .305 .430 8 12 .238 46/15/39 15 14
LAA AL 2020 39 152 15 34 9 25 8 0 6 25 0 0 .224 .270 .395 6 15 .230 40/20/41 9 9
LAA AL 2021 24 86 9 17 3 13 0 0 5 12 1 0 .198 .250 .372 3 14 .176 38/16/45 2 1
LAD NL 2021 76 176 18 46 10 29 3 0 12 37 1 0 .261 .305 .483 5 15 .248 49/16/35 8 7
Career 21yrs 2962 11101 1870 3299 1344 1346 672 16 679 2149 116 41 .297 .375 .544 11 11 .285 n/a
Welcome! You are invited to wander around and read all of the comments that have been posted here at Patton & Co., but as soon as you register you can see the bid limits that Alex, Peter and Mike propose for each player, and you can post your own comments. Registering is free, so please join us!

Sat back for what seemed like an eternity, but was able to get Pujols at $4 in the end game in my home AL-Only auction today. 

Pretty happy with the price.

Keith Cromer Slyke
Mar 31 '18

At that point you go for proven production in decline. The only better choice would be a reach for upside, and those guys will still be there in the next round and the round after that. It's a delicate balance, but certainly the olds are undervalued relative to our expectations on draft day. It's worth a look to see how they fare versus their actual performance.

Peter Kreutzer Rotoman
Jan 5 '18

I could only wish for snow, Alex. Calling for a -40C to -45C windchill here tonight. I drafted Pujols at #263 in the Magazine Mock and #264 here. I think he has another 20+ HR, 90+ RBI season in the tank and this late I simply can't pass. At the current going rate, I'll own him in a lot of my Leagues in 2018.

Tim McLeod tlmcleod
Jan 4 '18

Final installment from Bryan Grosnick at BP (first two under Kinsler and Cozart):


The team’s only real weak spot is designated hitter (presuming something like a Valbuena/C.J. Cron platoon at first base), where Albert Pujols looks a shell of his former self. This lineup is also very lopsided–only Kole Calhoun, Valbuena, and Ohtani hit from the left side–so I wouldn’t exactly tie a bow on it just yet, but it’s the type of team that will put The Fear into opposing pitchers. They did add substantial payroll to improve at these positions, but Cozart’s contract seems team-friendly if he carries over even half of his 2017 offensive gains. Meanwhile, Kinsler comes off the books after 2018.

Though this pushes them ever closer to the luxury tax threshold–and perhaps takes them out of contention for a top-flight starting pitcher beyond Ohtani–it shores up two positions and turns a moderate weakness (infield defense) into a strength. Last season’s Angels dropped out of the Wild Card race late, but what was then a stars-and-scrubs strategy now looks a lot more like stars-and-average-players approach, a trend that started with some savvy smaller acquisitions last offseason. The Halos still have a no-name bullpen and a rotation with more question marks than the Riddler’s suit jacket, but these two moves make them the favorite for the second Wild Card in 2018.

If owner Arte Moreno is willing to give general manager Billy Eppler and company the cash backing to pick up another starting pitcher, you might have to tear me away from an 88- or even 90-win projection. This Angels team that has started to take shape surrounds its stars with solid supporting pieces. When the stars are Mike Trout, Justin Upton, Andrelton Simmons, and now Shohei Ohtani, the sky’s the limit.

Alex Patton Alex
Dec 19 '17