Albert Pujols Los Angeles Dodgers

Age: 41 (January 16, 1980) | aka Prince Albert,Phat Albert, The Machine, El Hombre | 6' 3" | 240lbs. | Bats: Right 1B-26 DH-12
Tm Lg YEAR G AB R H BB SO 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BA OBP SLG BB% SO% BABIP G/L/F % $4x4 $5x5
STL NL 2002 157 590 118 185 72 69 40 2 34 127 2 4 .314 .394 .561 11 10 .308 n/a 36
STL NL 2003 157 591 137 212 79 65 51 1 43 124 5 1 .359 .439 .667 12 9 .346 n/a 48
STL NL 2004 154 592 133 196 84 52 51 2 46 123 5 5 .331 .415 .657 12 8 .298 n/a 42
STL NL 2005 161 591 129 195 97 65 38 2 41 117 16 2 .330 .430 .609 14 9 .316 n/a 47
STL NL 2006 143 535 119 177 92 50 33 1 49 137 7 2 .331 .431 .671 15 8 .292 n/a 44
STL NL 2007 158 565 99 185 99 58 38 1 32 103 2 6 .327 .429 .568 15 9 .317 n/a 33 30
STL NL 2008 148 524 100 187 104 54 44 0 37 116 7 3 .357 .462 .653 16 8 .340 n/a 44 39
STL NL 2009 160 568 124 186 115 64 45 1 47 135 16 4 .327 .443 .658 16 9 .299 n/a 52 45
STL NL 2010 159 587 115 183 103 76 39 1 42 118 14 4 .312 .414 .596 15 11 .297 n/a 46 40
STL NL 2011 147 579 105 173 61 58 29 0 37 99 9 1 .299 .366 .541 9 9 .277 45/17/38 38 34
LAA AL 2012 154 607 85 173 52 76 50 0 30 105 8 1 .285 .343 .516 8 11 .282 41/19/40 30 26
LAA AL 2013 99 391 49 101 40 55 19 0 17 64 1 1 .258 .330 .437 9 12 .258 38/20/42 14 12
LAA AL 2014 159 633 89 172 48 71 37 1 28 105 5 1 .272 .324 .466 7 10 .265 46/19/35 30 28
LAA AL 2015 157 602 85 147 50 72 22 0 40 95 5 3 .244 .307 .480 8 11 .217 42/16/42 25 24
LAA AL 2016 152 593 71 159 49 75 19 0 31 119 4 0 .268 .323 .457 8 12 .260 44/17/40 27 24
LAA AL 2017 149 593 53 143 37 93 17 0 23 101 3 0 .241 .286 .386 6 15 .249 43/18/38 16 14
LAA AL 2018 117 465 50 114 28 65 20 0 19 64 1 0 .245 .289 .411 6 13 .247 40/22/37 13 12
LAA AL 2019 131 491 55 120 43 68 22 0 23 93 3 0 .244 .305 .430 8 12 .238 46/15/39 15 14
LAA AL 2020 39 152 15 34 9 25 8 0 6 25 0 0 .224 .270 .395 6 15 .230 40/20/41 9 9
LAA AL 2021 24 86 9 17 3 13 0 0 5 12 1 0 .198 .250 .372 3 14 .176 38/16/45 2 1
LAD NL 2021 85 189 20 48 11 32 3 0 12 38 1 0 .254 .299 .460 5 16 .245 50/16/35 8 7
Career 21yrs 2971 11114 1872 3301 1345 1349 672 16 679 2150 116 41 .297 .375 .544 11 11 .285 n/a
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He should qualify at 1B by the end of April, or maybe even by the end of the second week of April, now that he won't be the full-time DH.  With his diminishing value, I'm not sure he would be a starting 1B for any 12 team AL league, but the added CM will be useful.

Eugene Freedman EugeneFreed
Dec 8 '17

It says something about Albert's initial greatness that his OBP could decline for eight years in a row between 2008 and 2015.

Walter Shapiro WShapiro
Dec 6 '17

Great observation by Ben Jedlovec, introducing the career stats section in The Bill James Handbook: "His Register on page 273 reads like two different players accidentally merged together."

Alex Patton Alex
Dec 6 '17

To drive in 100 runs with such unimpressive stats, I assumed Albert excelled with runners on.

Not the case. He was just slightly better with runners on (.247/.292/.399 in 291 AB).

But maybe he was clutch?

Not really. When the game was tied (182 AB), he slashed .227/.254/.420.

When the game was Late & Close (83 AB), he slashed .245/.311/.383.

Or maybe he was.

In situations that Baseball-Reference categorizes as High Leverage (118 AB), he slashed .305/.366/.500.

Alex Patton Alex
Nov 18 '17

I give him only 485 ABs and $20.  He may miss some time in April if his foot isn't ready for everyday play, even at DH.

If you prorate his stats, I bet we're pretty close, with us both predicting a decent profit.

Eugene Freedman EugeneFreed
Mar 9 '17

Sure, he's old and could fall off the cliff. He went for $15 and $17 in CBS and LABR, because someone has to pay for all the extra spent on the fancy young ones. Likely in our veteran home leagues the prices will be more sensible. My projection brooks no fall off, in fact posits an unlikely bump up in BA. I'm going to change that.

Peter Kreutzer Rotoman
Mar 8 '17

Using .300+ for BA and under .300 for BABIP in Bref as reference points.

From 1901-2016 there were 170 batters with at least 400 PA that matched this criteria and the decade of the 1950s dominated with 45 batters or 26.5% of the total. The 1990s had 22 but with 10-14 more team's worth of players per season plus the DH.

Using .325+/sub .325 as the criteria 78 batters the 1930s won that one with 25 or almost 1/3 of the total. 1950s had 12. There has been just one more hitter in the Division Era than in the 1950s alone.

Using .275+/sub .275 139 batters total 55 coming from 1940-59 and 57 total in the Division Era.

.310+/.290 minus 20 batters;, 8 from the 1950s

.280+/.270 minus 52 batters; 22 from the 40s and 50s 19 from the Division Era

.340/sub .340 51 batters; 16 from the 1930s; 11 from the 1950s; 12 in the Division Era(7 since 2000).

Cleary it was more commonplace in the Golden age of baseball, if you will, than today with the Division era having more of the lower BA/Babip than the higher ones.


van wilhoite LVW
Jan 7 '17

LVW points out on DiMaggio's page that the Yankee Clipper had a lifetime batting average 21 points higher than his BABIP. I checked around... Williams and Musial had a big difference in that direction, Aaron and Mays had a small difference.

Were they outliers or was there a time, not too long ago, when many, many players produced highers batting averages than BABIPs each year, as compared to the five who did that last year?

Alex Patton Alex
Jan 7 '17

The biggest difference, the biggest negative difference, between BABIP and batting average in the majors last year.

Unlike the four other players with a negative difference (Santana, Arrenado, Ortiz and Beltre) that I've just posted about, Albert does this all the time.

I'm pretty sure that no one else is even close in career difference.

BABIP wasn't something anyone paid attention to when he first started out, but it seems the last time he had a higher BABIP than batting average was his rookie year.

How much higher is BABIP than batting average for the average player?

Judging by last year, about 40 points. (The average batting average of all the players who had 400 plate appearances: .269. The average of their BABIPs: .307.)

Not sure what this means, exactly, but when you've played as long as Albert has and you've led the league as often (I'm guessing) as Albert has in the difference between the batting average on the back of your baseball card and the batting average on balls in play, it must mean something.

Alex Patton Alex
Jan 7 '17