Minnie Minoso Chicago White Sox

November 29, 1925 - March 01, 2015 | 5' 10" | 175lbs. | Bats: Right
Tm Lg YEAR G AB R H BB SO 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BA OBP SLG BB% SO% BABIP G/L/F % $4x4 $5x5
CLE AL 1949 9 16 2 3 2 2 0 0 1 1 0 1 .188 .350 .375 10 10 .154 n/a
CLE AL 1951 8 14 3 6 1 1 2 0 0 2 0 0 .429 .529 .571 6 6 .462 n/a
CHA AL 1951 138 516 109 167 71 41 32 14 10 74 31 10 .324 .419 .498 12 7 .338 n/a
CHA AL 1952 147 569 96 160 71 46 24 9 13 61 22 16 .281 .375 .424 11 7 .288 n/a
CHA AL 1953 151 556 104 174 74 43 24 8 15 104 25 16 .313 .410 .466 11 7 .319 n/a
CHA AL 1954 153 568 119 182 77 46 29 18 19 116 18 11 .320 .411 .535 11 7 .319 n/a
CHA AL 1955 139 517 79 149 76 43 26 7 10 70 19 8 .288 .387 .424 12 7 .297 n/a
CHA AL 1956 151 545 106 172 86 40 29 11 21 88 12 6 .316 .425 .525 13 6 .308 n/a
CHA AL 1957 153 568 96 176 79 54 36 5 12 103 18 15 .310 .408 .454 12 8 .321 n/a
CLE AL 1958 149 556 94 168 59 53 25 2 24 80 14 14 .302 .383 .484 9 8 .299 n/a
CLE AL 1959 148 570 92 172 54 46 32 0 21 92 8 10 .302 .377 .468 8 7 .298 n/a
CHA AL 1960 154 591 89 184 52 63 32 4 20 105 17 13 .311 .374 .481 8 10 .317 n/a
CHA AL 1961 152 540 91 151 67 46 28 3 14 82 9 4 .280 .369 .420 11 7 .278 n/a
STL NL 1962 39 97 14 19 7 17 5 0 1 10 4 0 .196 .271 .278 6 16 .228 n/a
WS2 AL 1963 109 315 38 72 33 38 12 2 4 30 8 6 .229 .315 .317 9 11 .246 n/a
CHA AL 1964 30 31 4 7 5 3 0 0 1 5 0 0 .226 .351 .323 13 8 .222 n/a
CHA AL 1976 3 8 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 .125 .125 .125 0 25 .167 n/a
CHA AL 1980 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 0.00 0.00 0 0 0.00 n/a
Career 17yrs 1835 6579 1136 1963 814 584 336 83 186 1023 205 130 .298 .389 .459 11 8 .303 n/a
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Thanks to Joe Posnanski, whose series  in The Athletic (subscription required) listed the 100 greatest players not in the Hall of Fame, ranking them in the order he would vote for them. 

Minnie Minoso today is number one.

"He is, in my mind, the biggest void in the Baseball Hall of Fame. It is, quite frankly, shocking and appalling that he was not elected while he was alive. And while you can make powerful arguments why Barry Bonds or Roger Clemens or Pete Rose or Shoeless Joe Jackson do not have a place in the Hall of Fame, no such arguments exist for Miñoso. He was a great player, a pioneer and a powerful force for good within the game.

"Every day that he is not in the Hall is a day that the Hall of Fame itself is diminished."

Agreed. I kept waiting, through 99 days of the series, for Minoso. This morning, there he was.

https://theathletic.com/2202108/2020/11/27/the-outsiders-hall-of-fame-top-100/


David Molyneaux NeauxBrainers ()
Jan 26

In Oberlin, Ohio, when I was a kid, my favorite barber was Vic. His skin was a deep black, which occasionally led to barbershop conversations with white folks during which Vic would point out that he was not Negro, he was Cuban. I always aimed for Vic’s chair because we talked baseball. Mostly, I listened. His favorite player was a Cuban, Minnie Minoso, who began playing professionally in 1946, at age 20, for the New York Cubans in the Negro leagues and became an All-Star third baseman. Minoso was signed by the Cleveland Indians in 1948, their last Major League Baseball championship season, which I believe would not have been their last if they had held onto Minnie Minoso. (The Indians were home to four of the first 11 players to break the baseball color line: Larry Doby, 1947, Satchel Paige, 1948, Minoso and Luke Easter, 1949).

By 1951, when I was 6, two additional Negro League players, Harry Simpson and Sam Jones, had reached the Majors, meaning that the Indians were the home team to six of the first 20 players to break the Major’s color line. All of that was a big deal in my hometown barbershop.

I remember that Vic the barber was steaming about the way Minoso was treated by Cleveland. The Indians had farmed him out to the minors for the years 1949 and 1950, when Vic was certain that Minoso was good enough to play regularly in the majors. He was angry about a magazine article he read (6-year-olds retain information about adult stories they don’t understand) that indicated Cleveland was trying to trade Minoso. Why? Because the team was reticent about the number of Negro ballplayers when other clubs had none. That’s what Vic read and he complained loudly, “Minoso’s not Negro, he’s Cuban.”

Turned out Vic was right about Minoso’s readiness. After he was traded to the Chicago White Sox in 1951, Minoso was second in the ballot for American League rookie of the year, 4th on the vote for MVP, and an All-Star.

This weekend, Vic’s story came to mind in a piece in The Athletic by James Fegan, who quoted Negro League Baseball Museum president Bob Kendrick, a strong supporter for Minoso’s induction to the Hall of Fame. Kendrick said that the announcement from Major League Baseball to re-classify Negro Leagues statistics and records as part of Major League will help fortify the statistical case for Minoso, but, he said, they won’t change the two seasons when Cleveland buried him in the Class AAA Pacific Coast.

Minoso died at 89 in 2015.

David Molyneaux NeauxBrainers ()
Dec 20 '20