Jordan Yamamoto Miami Marlins

Age: 23 (May 11, 1996) | 6' 0" | 185lbs. | Throws: Right Minors: p-10
Tm Lg YEAR W L SV Hld G GS IP H HR BB SO ERA WHIP Rating BB/9 SO/9 BABIP G/L/F % $4x4 $5x5
MIL R 2015 1 6 1 0 14 11 62.0 99 12 22 59 7.84 1.95 2.06 3.2 8.6 .429 n/a
MIL A 2016 7 8 0 0 27 18 134.1 130 6 31 152 3.82 1.20 1.15 2.1 10.2 .353 n/a
MIL A+ 2017 9 4 1 0 22 18 111.0 91 8 30 113 2.51 1.09 1.06 2.4 9.2 .293 n/a
MIA R 2018 1 0 0 0 3 3 11.0 5 1 2 15 2.45 0.64 0.68 1.6 12.3 .200 n/a
MIA A+ 2018 4 1 0 0 7 7 40.2 26 0 8 47 1.55 0.84 0.74 1.8 10.4 .278 n/a
MIA AA 2018 1 0 0 0 3 3 17.0 12 1 4 23 2.12 0.94 0.91 2.1 12.2 .306 n/a
MIA NL 2019 2 0 0 0 2 2 14.0 5 0 4 12 0.00 0.64 0.50 2.6 7.7 .154 34/16/50 6 5
Career 1yr 2 0 0 0 2 2 14.0 5 0 4 12 0.00 0.64 0.50 2.6 7.7 .154 n/a
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Today at BP...

The Background: Of the four players listed in the return haul Miami received for All-Star Christian Yelich from the Milwaukee Brewers, Yamamoto is often mentioned last behind Lewis Brinson, Monte Harrison, and Isan Díaz. Yet in the season-and-a-half since the Yelich trade, Yamamoto has produced the best of the quartet, landing at no. 9 on the team’s prospect rankings.

Durability has been a question in recent years, as he began his tenure with Miami on the injured list and spent another month on the shelf with nagging problems that saw his velocity tick down into the mid-to-upper 80s. Even so, he finished the 2018 campaign with an ERA under 2, a WHIP under 1, and his typical pre-trade strikeout-to-walk ratios.

So far in 2019 at Double-A Jacksonville, Yamamoto’s velocity is back into the low 90s and the stuff is present. However, his control hasn’t been as sharp as years past, with an increased amount of walks and home runs allowed compared to the bar he previously set.

Scouting Report: By no means is Yamamoto to be confused with the modern day physical specimen often found in frontline starters. Generously listed at an even 6-foot, he is well-built within his frame with thick legs and a strong upper body. His delivery is repeatable due to excellent body control, and he is able to add and subtract his effort depending on how he wants to manipulate the pitch.

The fringe-average fastball has some late arm-side run, generally sitting 90-91 but he can pump it up 93-95 when he wants to reach back in a 2-strike count. His strength as a pitcher comes from his secondary offerings: two different breaking balls and a changeup that grade out average or better. Oftentimes he will work backwards, using his high-spin, slow curveball to grab strikes early in the count when batters are expecting conventional velocity. The mid-80s slider has late-breaking two-plane tilt that is very effective against right-handed hitters.

Alex Patton Alex

Shuts out the Cardinals over seven innings in his debut. How could he not? His parents and sister flew in from Hawaii 

Alex Patton Alex