Jim Rice Boston Red Sox

Age: 66 (March 8, 1953) | 6' 2" | 205lbs. | Bats: Right
Tm Lg YEAR G AB R H BB SO 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BA OBP SLG BB% SO% BABIP G/L/F % $4x4 $5x5
BOS AL 1974 24 67 6 18 4 12 2 1 1 13 0 0 .269 .307 .373 5 16 .298 n/a
BOS AL 1975 144 564 92 174 36 122 29 4 22 102 10 5 .309 .350 .491 6 20 .355 n/a
BOS AL 1976 153 581 75 164 28 123 25 8 25 85 8 5 .282 .315 .482 4 20 .314 n/a
BOS AL 1977 160 644 104 206 53 120 29 15 39 114 5 4 .320 .376 .593 7 17 .341 n/a
BOS AL 1978 163 677 121 213 58 126 25 15 46 139 7 5 .315 .370 .600 8 17 .327 n/a
BOS AL 1979 158 619 117 201 57 97 39 6 39 130 9 4 .325 .381 .596 8 14 .330 n/a
BOS AL 1980 124 504 81 148 30 87 22 6 24 86 8 3 .294 .336 .504 6 16 .313 n/a
BOS AL 1981 108 451 51 128 34 76 18 1 17 62 2 2 .284 .333 .441 7 15 .304 n/a
BOS AL 1982 145 573 86 177 55 98 24 5 24 97 0 1 .309 .375 .494 9 15 .337 n/a
BOS AL 1983 155 626 90 191 52 102 34 1 39 126 0 2 .305 .361 .550 8 15 .310 n/a
BOS AL 1984 159 657 98 184 44 102 25 7 28 122 4 0 .280 .323 .467 6 14 .293 n/a
BOS AL 1985 140 546 85 159 51 75 20 3 27 103 2 0 .291 .349 .487 8 12 .291 n/a
BOS AL 1986 157 618 98 200 62 78 39 2 20 110 0 1 .324 .384 .490 9 11 .340 n/a
BOS AL 1987 108 404 66 112 45 77 14 0 13 62 1 1 .277 .357 .408 10 17 .312 n/a
BOS AL 1988 135 485 57 128 48 89 18 3 15 72 1 1 .264 .330 .406 9 16 .292 n/a
BOS AL 1989 56 209 22 49 13 39 10 2 3 28 1 0 .234 .276 .344 6 17 .267 n/a
Career 16yrs 2089 8225 1249 2452 670 1423 373 79 382 1451 58 34 .298 .352 .502 7 16 .318 n/a
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There's a misconception that Rice was a liability defensively. Those that saw him say differently.....


  • "…He plays The Wall almost as well as Yastrzemski did in his prime. His arm is as good as any left-fielder’s in the league, and he routinely holds balls off The Big Green Thing to singles." Steve Wulf, Sports Illustrated, 8/6/1984
  • "While Rice’s hitting commands attention, he also has mastered the art of playing balls off the left-field wall. On several occasions this year, he’s either thrown runners out (he has 10 assists) at second or held the hitter to a single with his barehanded grabs of balls coming off the Green Monster." Joe Giuliotti, The Sporting News, 9/20/1982
  • "With George Scott injured and Yaz filling in at first base, Rice has played more in the outfield this season, and played it well." Time, 6/12/1978
  • "He took over for me in left field and really learned how to judge balls off the left field wall." Carl Yastrzemski, RedSox.com, 1/29/2001
  • "…He became a better-than-average left fielder who could really play that Fenway Park wall." Don Zimmer, RedSox.com, 1/29/2001
  • "He may have been the hardest working ballplayer I was ever associated with. We would go out to the park before anyone, and I would hit ball after ball to him in left field. He became a master of playing that tricky Green Monster wall." Johnny Pesky, RedSox.com, 1/29/2001
  • "In ’75, his rookie season, Rice played 98 games in left, didn't make an error, threw out six runners and played the unpredictable caroms off the Fenway Green Monster flawlessly." Mark Ribowsky, Sport, July, 1978.
  • "Rice always worked on his skills…Despite his speed, arm strength, and body control that allowed him to dive and cradle the ball without the jar of landing, he had to work hard on playing left field…Five days a week he would take fungoes from Pesky, first practicing charging grounders, then taking flies off The Wall. After eight seasons, he finally got out of the shadow of Yastrezemski, whose unique style of playing left field like a shortstop had paled anyone else who went out there. But by his ninth year in Boston, Rice, too, owned the new Wall, and in 1983 he had as many assists (twenty-one) as Yaz ever had in one season and probably should have won a Gold Glove for fielding excellence. Dwight Evans, who had the worst defensive year of his career, won one instead, proving clearly the value of a reputation." Peter Gammons, Beyond the Sixth Game, 1985.

The anecdotal evidence from first hand observers makes it clear that Rice developed a solid defensive reputation during his playing days. Only later did writers – usually writers who only witnessed a hobbled, aging Rice in his final three seasons – paint him as a defensive liability. It’s an easy, albeit incorrect, conclusion to draw for those who saw his waning days, when in reality Rice was worn down by a dozen years of playing through every injury that didn’t involve broken bones.


van wilhoite LVW
Feb 16