Milt Pappas Chicago Cubs

Age: 79 (May 11, 1939) | aka Gimpy | 6' 3" | 190lbs. | Throws: Right
Tm Lg YEAR W L SV Hld G GS IP H HR BB SO ERA WHIP Rating BB/9 SO/9 BABIP G/L/F % $4x4 $5x5
BAL AL 1957 0 0 0 0 4 0 9.0 6 0 3 3 1.00 1.00 0.83 3.0 3.0 .211 n/a
BAL AL 1958 10 10 0 0 31 21 135.1 135 8 48 72 4.06 1.35 1.26 3.2 4.8 .291 n/a
BAL AL 1959 15 9 3 0 33 27 209.1 175 8 75 120 3.27 1.19 1.07 3.2 5.2 .262 n/a
BAL AL 1960 15 11 0 0 30 27 205.2 184 15 83 126 3.37 1.30 1.21 3.6 5.5 .271 n/a
BAL AL 1961 13 9 1 0 26 23 177.2 134 16 78 89 3.04 1.19 1.11 4.0 4.5 .223 n/a
BAL AL 1962 12 10 0 0 35 32 205.1 200 31 75 130 4.03 1.34 1.38 3.3 5.7 .273 n/a
BAL AL 1963 16 9 0 0 34 32 216.2 186 21 69 120 3.03 1.18 1.16 2.9 5.0 .252 n/a
BAL AL 1964 16 7 0 0 37 36 251.2 225 21 48 157 2.97 1.08 1.11 1.7 5.6 .270 n/a
BAL AL 1965 13 9 0 0 34 34 221.1 192 22 52 127 2.60 1.10 1.13 2.1 5.2 .255 n/a
CIN NL 1966 12 11 0 0 33 32 209.2 224 23 39 133 4.29 1.25 1.33 1.7 5.7 .305 n/a
CIN NL 1967 16 13 0 0 34 32 217.2 218 19 38 129 3.35 1.18 1.22 1.6 5.3 .291 n/a
CIN NL 1968 2 5 0 0 15 11 62.2 70 9 10 43 5.60 1.28 1.41 1.4 6.2 .313 n/a
ATL NL 1968 10 8 0 0 22 19 121.1 111 8 22 75 2.37 1.10 1.10 1.6 5.6 .278 n/a
ATL NL 1969 6 10 0 0 26 24 144.0 149 14 44 72 3.62 1.34 1.33 2.8 4.5 .288 n/a
ATL NL 1970 2 2 0 0 11 3 35.2 44 6 7 25 6.06 1.43 1.58 1.8 6.3 .335 n/a
CHN NL 1970 10 8 0 0 21 20 144.2 135 14 36 80 2.68 1.18 1.20 2.2 5.0 .270 n/a
CHN NL 1971 17 14 0 0 35 35 261.1 279 25 62 99 3.51 1.30 1.33 2.1 3.4 .285 n/a
CHN NL 1972 17 7 0 0 29 28 195.0 187 18 29 80 2.77 1.11 1.17 1.3 3.7 .265 n/a
CHN NL 1973 7 12 0 0 30 29 162.0 192 20 40 48 4.28 1.43 1.49 2.2 2.7 .296 n/a
Career 17yrs 209 164 4 0 520 465 3186.0 3046 298 858 1728 3.40 1.23 1.23 2.4 4.9 .275 n/a
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The book Traded: Inside the Most Lopsided Trades in Baseball History uses Bill James's WinShares to compare trades. It has the Pappas/Robinson trade as only the 16th worst(Robby had 38 more than Pappas) after the trade.  #1 is Christy Mathewson for Amos Rusie(142 Win Shares difference). 

It ranks Schilling, Harnisch, and Finley for Glenn Davis as #1(609 WS difference). 

van wilhoite LVW
Feb 9

Yeah - that's a really cheap call by an ump to let a 27th batter spoil a perfect game taking a pitch anywhere near the plate, much less on the black.

In that situation, you make the batter put the ball in play if the pitcher is making an honest effort to throw a hittable pitch.

Meanwhile - imagine the 1970 Reds with Robinson in right field, and Rose back at 2B instead of Helms.  

Phil Ponebshek Texpope
Feb 8

Except Milt, who never forgot it, not one pitch.

Schoenfield:

In September 1972, while pitching for the Chicago Cubs,
Pappas retired the first 26 Padres he faced. He got ahead 1-2 on
pinch-hitter Larry Stahl, who then worked it to a full count. The 3-2
pitch was a fastball on the outside corner. Or on the black. Or just
outside. Stahl checked his swing. Umpire Bruce Froemming called it ball
four and in the video you can see Pappas barking at Froemming, with some of the obscenities in Greek. Pappas completed the no-hitter but always maintained that
Froemming blew the call. "I really don't know what Bruce was thinking,"
Pappas said in a 1989 interview. "I think he was very stupid in what he
did. ... All he had to do was raise his right hand and I'm sure nobody
would have squawked."

Pappas described the entire sequence to WGN.tv on the 100th anniversary of Wrigley Field:

"I'm one pitch from the greatest thing a pitcher can do. Next pitch was a
slider on the outside corner, ball two. Next pitch, another slider on
the corner, ball three. All these pitches were right there and I'm
saying 'C'mon, Froemming, they're all right there.' Now comes the 3-2
pitch, again on the outside corner, ball four. I went crazy. I called
Bruce Froemming every name you can think of. I knew he didn't have the
guts to throw me out, because I still had the no-hitter. The next guy,
Garry Jestadt popped up to Carmen Fanzone and I got the no-hitter, which
was great. But those balls should have been called strikes."

Alex Patton Alex
Feb 8

Who knew it would be such a bad trade? Pappas had been a stud for the Orioles and was still only 27. Robinson was 30.

David Schoenfield, writing about Pappas after his death three years ago:

The young Pappas threw hard. Harry Brecheen, his pitching coach in the
early 1960s, was quoted in the "1965 Official Baseball Almanac" as
saying a young "Milt has more hard stuff than anyone in the league. He
can use his fastball more than most pitchers because he has one that
sinks and one that rises."

He made his first All-Star team in 1962 and then started the game in 1965 after going 9-3 with a 1.74 ERA in the first half.

Later he points out:

Still, there have been many more lopsided trades than this one. Pappas
accumulated 24.9 WAR after the trade, Robinson 43.4. The Reds just made
things worse by trading away Pappas, who went on to have several solid
seasons with the Cubs after they acquired him from the Braves. In fact,
by FanGraphs WAR, the 1970 Cubs rotation of Fergie Jenkins, Ken
Holtzman, Bill Hands and Pappas ranks as the best of the divisional era,
tied with the 2011 Phillies at 26.0 WAR. But the bullpen and offense
weren't as good and the Cubs finished 84-78.

http://www.espn.com/blog/sweetspot/post/_/id/69908/milt-pappas-remembered-for-frank-robinson-trade-and-near-perfect-game

No one remembers the near-perfect game.

Alex Patton Alex
Feb 8