Craig Kimbrel Free Agent

Age: 30 (May 28, 1988) | 6' 0" | 210lbs. | Throws: Right P-63
Tm Lg YEAR W L SV Hld G GS IP H HR BB SO ERA WHIP Rating BB/9 SO/9 BABIP G/L/F % $4x4 $5x5
ATL NL 2014 0 3 47 0 63 0 61.2 30 2 26 95 1.61 0.91 0.75 3.8 13.9 .262 41/23/35 38 25
SD NL 2015 4 2 39 0 61 0 59.1 40 6 22 87 2.58 1.04 1.01 3.3 13.2 .297 46/20/34 33 21
BOS AAA 2016 0 0 0 0 1 1 0.1 1 0 0 0 0.00 3.00 3.00 0.0 0.0 .515 n/a
BOS AL 2016 2 6 31 0 57 0 53.0 28 4 30 83 3.40 1.09 0.92 5.1 14.1 .265 29/23/48 24 16
BOS AL 2017 5 0 35 1 67 0 69.0 33 6 14 126 1.43 0.68 0.71 1.8 16.4 .282 37/19/44 45 31
BOS AL 2018 5 1 42 0 63 0 62.1 31 7 31 96 2.74 0.99 0.91 4.5 13.9 .231 28/25/47 38 23
Career 9yrs 31 19 333 1 542 0 532.1 285 35 205 868 1.91 0.92 0.83 3.5 14.7 .283 n/a
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Coals to Newcastle. While the World Champs seem to be wearing the emperor's clothes.

Alex Patton Alex

Rotoworld saying Brewers are in 'serious talks'.

Ridiculous bullpen if that happens - they might as well call the game if the Brewers are up after 5 innings.

Keith Prosseda andypro

Can the Red Sox have their qualifying offer and eat it too?

Get a high draft pick when someone else signs him, and if no one does, sign him themselves for less than the offer?

Alex Patton Alex

I suspect the biggest obstacle to signing him are his expectations for $$$s/years ... and what the small handful of teams who think they have a need for him are willing to offer.

Phil Ponebshek Texpope

So that's the biggest obstacle to signing him; there's a POV that even Luddite front offices, if there are any left, can agree on.

Alex Patton Alex

Yes, they did make a qualifying offer to him.

John Thomas Roll2

Did the Red Sox make a qualifying offer?

Alex Patton Alex

"Once we understand that’s what’s really going on, however, it becomes easier to understand—and harder to criticize the decisions teams are making."

Yes to this.  Clearly, front offices have been taken over by lots of smart sabermetrics guys who are all tinkering with formulas and who have little or no respect for precedent in figuring out how lineups/bullpens should be structured, how much to pay or how contracts should be structured.

And clearly we're not at the point of convergence on everything - particularly on lineup/bullpen construction different teams definitely have different POVs.

If Kimbrel believes that the only role he wants to fill is a 9th inning shut-down guy ... he's now limited his market to those teams who want a 9th inning shut-down guy and are willing to pay for an elite closer.  And a lot of those teams already have, or think they have, that guy.

Phil Ponebshek Texpope

More from Matthew Trueblood at BP (the first is under Keuchel):

Kimbrel, meanwhile, has always done things a certain way—always held a certain role, pitched at certain moments in certain games, and used a certain repertoire. It’s easy to see why he wouldn’t want to change any of that; he’s a Hall of Fame-caliber closer. It’s also relatively easy to see why, in an era of increasingly flexible bullpen usage and with so many teams wanting to build less expensive versions of what Kimbrel is, they’re not prone to value his skills the same way he does.

The future is here. Almost nothing that happened before 2015 is relevant to the way teams will make decisions about 2019. Discontinuous change is chaotic, extreme, and often painful. It comes with many casualties. Once we understand that’s what’s really going on, however, it becomes easier to understand—and harder to criticize the decisions teams are making.

Alex Patton Alex

Cubs? That's what they're talking about today.

Alex Patton Alex