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The last twenty comments in true blog fasion, with the links to their authors and the player commented upon.

Welcome! You are invited to wander around and read all of the comments that have been posted here at Patton & Co., but as soon as you register you can see the bid limits that Alex, Peter and Mike propose for each player, and you can post your own comments. Registering is free, so please join us!
If you saw this one coming, you're welcome to pick my lottery numbers going forward. Tatis is now listed as 5-10 after going at a bigger height back in the day; I suppose he's done trying to impress those basketball scouts. Did enough against RHP to keep those at-bats, but they'll probably slide him to a skinnier role. Root with your heart, not with your wallet.
scott pianowski ballfour
Jan 13 '09
Rickey Henderson Oakland Athletics
With Rickie at the top of your lineup, you had a good offense. It was that simple.
Alex Patton Alex
Jan 13 '09
The greatest Rotisserie player of all-time.

The most singular talent in baseball history. The most drawn walks ever. The most steals ever. The most runs ever. 3000 hits. 2000 walks. 50% more steals than anyone else in the history of the game. Nearly 300 HR. .400 career on base percentage. The player little ball was designed for, but nothing about Rickey was little. He would get on, get himself over, and get in on the weakest of balls in play.

Should have won the 1985 MVP. Won it in 1990.
Eugene Freedman EugeneFreed
Jan 13 '09
Jim Rice Boston Red Sox
Dave Parker, Andre Dawson, and Dale Murphy are essentially the same as Rice, yet receive much less support.

Tim Raines and Alan Trammell are MUCH better than Rice yet receive little support as well.

Ted Simmons, Dwight Evans, and Lou Whitaker are better than Rice and didn't last more than a season or three on the ballot.

It's just a curious voting system when "fear" rests more in the heart of white sportswriters than it did for pitchers. They surely didn't intentionally walk the guy. That would indicate fear. Yet, he scared a lot of writers.
Eugene Freedman EugeneFreed
Jan 13 '09
Carl Pavano Minnesota Twins
Jeter has been a noose for years now. That initial spurt (4 straight world series victories) innoculated him against criticism, but he's a bad shortstop who has enough offensive skills to sort of justify playing there.

The problem is that the Yankees have unlimited resources, and they haven't won in 8 years. Can you blame this on Jeter and his ridiculous contract? Or Posada and his absurd deal? No! Blame Brian Cashman and whatever strings are pulling his signing arm.

When you name your field Legends you obligate yourself to produce more of such. The Yankees are victims of awful utilization of bountiful resources. The Steinbrenners may be at fault, but the legacy is Brian Cashman's.

(Ps. The Yankee dynasty of the late 1990s was built when George was banned from baseball, and Gene Michael was able to make a team and farm system with the help of Showalter and Torre and no doubt others whose names I don't know.) The point is, it was built when there were no Steinbrenners in the house. And they had yet to hire the lacky Cashman.
Peter Kreutzer Rotoman
Jan 12 '09
Colby Rasmus Baltimore Orioles
He's young enough that last year's hiccup could actually be a hiccup. Or love lost.

I thought he'd step into an open situation last year and kill, but that was totally wrong. I don't think that means he won't be a major league regular, maybe this year, and eventually a very good one. Any dropoff in price is a buying opportunity.
Peter Kreutzer Rotoman
Jan 12 '09
Yusmeiro Petit Oakland Athletics
I'm a big fan. And I'm hoping it takes less than $5 to get him. I think it may.
Peter Kreutzer Rotoman
Jan 12 '09
Mat Gamel New York Yankees
I don't think anyone thinks Gamel is a solution at 3B, but he is expected to hit enough to play an OF corner. That, obviously, is a problem when it comes to configuring the Brewers lineup. I would be cautious betting on a Gamel breakout this year.
Peter Kreutzer Rotoman
Jan 12 '09
Jim Rice Boston Red Sox
I'm wondering why we aren't showing the whole of Rice's career the way we are Rickey's.

I think we all have to agree that the HOF voting is not science, that there isn't a cut and dried line between qualified and not, that intangibles and sentiment matter, and it's only a building full of memorabilia.

It seems to me that the baseball writers, despite their obvious deficiencies, have done a pretty good job. Rice, like Perez, is borderline, but both were successful and charismatic and don't really belong, but they could hit.

And maybe that's enough for a building full of memorabilia.

The bottom line is that we all get to make our own lists of who deserves veneration and who doesn't, and the naysayers when it comes to Rice are going to diminish the imprimatur of the HoF, which is a good thing.
Peter Kreutzer Rotoman
Jan 12 '09
Rickey Henderson Oakland Athletics
Whether or not you were a "Rickey guy", you cannot argue his impact and accomplishments.

Those 28 writers should have their HOF vote taken away, IMO.

Keith Cromer Slyke
Jan 12 '09
94.8% of the vote in HOF balloting. Could someone please point me and my Ed Sprague game-used bat toward that other 5.2% of the writers?
Thomas Odom Mendoza
Jan 12 '09
Jim Rice Boston Red Sox
Made it into the HOF today, with 76.4% of the vote in his final year or eligibility.
Thomas Odom Mendoza
Jan 12 '09
Bobby Abreu Philadelphia Phillies
Joe Sheehan's thought was that demand for Abreu would be great enough that the Yankees should have offered arbitration. They would have gotten draft picks if he declined, and if he accepted he was better than the other options out there anyway. Abreu makes a nice Yankee.

With the Teixeira signing, and the Swisher trade, the Yanks don't actually have room for Abreu. And improbably, there doesn't seem to be market for him right now.

My prediction is that whoever signs Abreu will do better than expected this year.
Peter Kreutzer Rotoman
Jan 11 '09
Daisuke Matsuzaka New York Mets
Just a note of caution heading into 2009. Although I have been a big supporter of Dice-K since well before his arrival in North America, the upcoming WBC Classic and his participation does cause me some concern. An overworked Dice early in 2009 could spell trouble come mid-August.
Tim McLeod tlmcleod
Jan 11 '09
Bobby Abreu Philadelphia Phillies
I can't speak for jeffamerk, but I wasn't getting at the idea that it matters whether or not Abreu is a "leader" or not.

(For what it's worth, I'm mostly on your side, though I do think there are a very small handful of players whose leadership and character do make a difference. I agree with you that measuring this is an exercise in futility).

My point was that there are certain players who seem to play better in smaller markets and under dimmer lights. Quantifying this is also a likely exercise in futility. Nevertheless, certain players who thrive or fail under the media microscope do spring to mind, and there are enough of these examples that it surely can't be entirely anecdotal.
Mike Gianella MikeG
Jan 11 '09
I think leadership is a post hoc rationalization. It's not quite in the same category of the Willie Bloomquist argument, but it's not far off: http://joeposnanski.com/JoeBlog/2009/01/11/willie-bloomquist-and-the-dunn/

We don't know what goes on in the clubhouse, nor what players do for and to teammates. All we see is fist pumping and yelling at teammates on the field. Furthermore, the media is unlikely to expound on the leadership skills of Latin players, mostly because of the language barrier.

Kenny Lofton was considered, at least by Joe Torre, a problem in the clubhouse, yet his teams won two league Pennants, and made the playoffs 11 times in 17 years. Manny Ramirez, a clubhouse cancer, 10 times in 16 years, including 4 pennants and 2 WS Championships. Both look somewhat lackadasical in the field, although Lofton made up for it with speed.

What I'm saying is that it takes both quality players and a quality team to succeed. After the team is successful the writers can add a story to the equation, which includes leaders and gamers, and whatever else they need to tell a story of success.

Abreu was a great, under appreciated player in Philadelphia, a slightly less valuable, but very good player in NY. Now, his defensive value is limited, but a guy who bats close to .290 with 70+ walks, 40 doubles, and 20 HR is an extremely valuable player. If his team is bad he won't get the same credit as a worse player on a better team in most instances.
Eugene Freedman EugeneFreed
Jan 11 '09
That's an astute observation, jeffamerk. You could make the same argument the other way, though. Playing on a 70-80 win team might be just the panacea that a guy like Abreu needs: even a great year won't make a difference, so he might just go out and have one. He's not that old.
Mike Gianella MikeG
Jan 11 '09
Mat Gamel New York Yankees
We're not likely to see the Braun of 2007 many more times but the potential to earn between $15 and $20 is there.
jeff merk jeffamerk
Jan 10 '09
Bobby Abreu Philadelphia Phillies
Being a Phillies fan, I know that he's a paper tiger but I'm also shocked that he's still unsigned. He seemed to be a perfect fit for the Yankees, where he could just worry about his numbers and not be pressured to exhibit any kind of leadership skills.
jeff merk jeffamerk
Jan 10 '09
Brad Penny Miami Marlins
I think the Mystery Pitcher factor only holds up for roughly two months so he's clearly a draft low and sell high in June candidate.
jeff merk jeffamerk
Jan 10 '09

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