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Without even registering, you can see a few players that we talk about. The salary scans are for standard 4x4 Rotisserie leagues. The three different bids are for the three most common leagues, explained in more detail in the Glossary.

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Here are the last ten comments made by our members:

Dee Gordon
Alex
about 12 hours ago
MikeG grades himself today at BP for his final NL bids posted before the season.

His method is to compare his prices against the average price that was paid in actual drafts. And then ask himself if his price is a win or a loss against the market?

For example, the average paid for Dee Gordon in CBS, LABR and Tout was $4. Mike's bid limit was $9. For that he gets a +5. Very clearly in the win column.

For Anthony Rizzo, the expert leagues averaged $24. Mike's stopping point was $21. For that he gets a -3. It goes in the loss column because Rizzo earned a nice profit even at $24.

His charts show every player on which he and the market differed by $3 or more, and the wins far outnumber the losses.

baseballprospectus.com
Billy Beane
Alex
about 15 hours ago
Can't fault the methodology: base a team's expected won-lost record on how it ranks with 29 other teams in its payroll that year; compare its expected won-lost record to the actual record.

Top five general managers in Avg Wins Above Expectation (minimum five years as GM): Beane, Friedman, Mozeliak, Sabean, Daniels.

The bottom five: Huntington, Amaro, Moore, Dombrowski, Zduriencik.

So where does Brian Cashman fit in?

He doesn't. "I left off a few GM's because either I was lazy in manually finding the years they managed different teams (Sandy Alderson) or I just really don't care that much about them as individuals or their franchises (Doug Melvin and Brian Cashman)."

Kind of a reverse Steinberg cartoon.
Taijuan Walker
tlmcleod
about 15 hours ago
Walker has called it a day (personal decision) and left Surprise with only a scant nine innings under his belt. A shame, as it would have been a great opportunity to view a future ace up close and personal next week.
Buster Posey
Alex
about 16 hours ago
How important is Buster Posey?

Mike Petriello at Fangraphs points out that Posey's second half in 2013 and first half in 2014 weren't very good. Using the All-Star game as the dividing line, he finds that Posey hit .264/.333/.379 in 570 plate appearnces and calls this Posey's "secretly mediocre season." Posey's a catcher, so it doesn't quite add up to a full season for the Giants. The team's won-lost record in the games he played during that time was 71-70.

www.fangraphs.com/blogs/a-tale-of-two-buster-poseys
Phil Hughes
Alex
about 16 hours ago
Interesting article by John Roegele at the Hardball Times that found its way into Slate.

The headline: Baseball’s Strike Zone Expansion Is Out of Control

The evidence: Using PITCHf/x data to split up up the front plane of home plate into a grid of 1-inch-by-1-inch cells, then "calculating the percentage of called pitches that crossed the plate in each grid cell that were deemed strikes. Every cell location that is called a strike more often than a ball is included in the strike zone for a given season."

The data:

Average Size of Called Strike Zone (sq. in.)
Year Size
2008 436
2009 435
2010 436
2011 448
2012 456
2013 459
2014 475

The conclusion: "The average strike zone size increased by 16 square inches in 2014 over 2013, growing the zone to a robust 40 square inches larger than just five seasons prior. In the previous articles, we discussed how the zone has actually been squeezing in at the sides slightly, but is stretching like crazy down from the knees as if it is under the clutches of gravity."

Also: "Another interesting note is that while the zone for right-handed hitters has always been slightly larger than for left-handed hitters, the gap has grown to the point where righties faced a zone 17 square inches larger in 2014, on average, than their lefty counterparts."

www.slate.com/articles/sports/sports_nut/2014

Alex
about 17 hours ago
Interesting article by John Roegle at the Hardball Times that found its way into Slate.

The thesis: Baseball’s Strike Zone Expansion Is Out of Control

The research: "My approach involves splitting up the front plane of home plate into a grid of 1-inch-by-1-inch cells, and calculating the percentage of called pitches that crossed the plate in each grid cell that were deemed strikes. Every cell location that is called a strike more often than a ball is included in the strike zone for a given season."

The data:

Average Size of Called Strike Zone (sq. in.)
Year Size
2008 436
2009 435
2010 436
2011 448
2012 456
2013 459
2014 475

The conclusion: "What I found was perhaps not surprising—the strike zone did continue to expand, and that expansion was almost entirely due to the bottom of the zone dropping once again. What surprised me was that this season saw the largest single-year increase in the size of the strike zone in the PITCHf/x era."


http://www.slate.com/articles/sports/sports_nut/2014/10/baseball_s_strike_zone_is_getting_bigger_every_year_will_someone_shrink.html
Billy Beane
Seadogs
about 18 hours ago
Found this take on the WAR value of GM's.

Guess who is #1 ... Over at Az Snake Pit

Chris Johnson
Alex
1 day ago
Maybe. But his already poor K/W got even worse. Can't blame that on the shift.

LVW
1 day ago
131 point drop in BABIP on line drives. A victim of the shift?
Jon Jay
LVW
1 day ago
2014 MLB ranks(Min 400 PA)

BABIP 9th(.363)
LD% 3rd(28.3%)
Lowest InfFly 11th(1.5% on a 19.9 FB%)

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